Coffee methods that put Starbucks to shame

 

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It’s no secret that coffee is the fuel we need to get through the day. Here at Don Complex HQ we can’t keep off the stuff. No doubt you guys are the same. We’ve taken to brewing our own rather than running out to Starbucks every 30 minutes – it seems stupid to boost productivity with caffeine if you’re going to waste the time you’ve gained by queueing up to have your name misspelled on a skinny frappe, right? Right. Assuming you’ve already got a bog-standard filter coffee maker, here are four of our favourite upgrades to get your buzz on and your productivity through the roof. Black, no sugar.

 

Aeropress

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Hands-down our favourite – the Aeropress (made by the same guys who make frisbees, unexpectedly) is the go-to coffee gadget. Essentially a giant syringe, a paper filter sits where a needle would… place it over your cup, add the grounds to the chamber, then pour your water. The plunger is then inserted and slowly pressed down, pushing the water through the coffee and the filter and into your cup. Unscrew the lid and throw the grounds, rinse, and done. By far the easiest to clean, and the smoothest and most flavoursome results. Strong and addictively drinkable. Just the way we like it. Bonus points: it can also be used to make tea.

 

French Press/Cafetiere

French Press coffee

The easiest upgrade to make we reckon – the french press is a simple way to get a much fuller-flavoured cup of coffee with very minimal effort and a classy set-up. Ground coffee is spooned into the beaker (about 1 tablespoon per person/depending on size of the press), and the (slightly less than) boiling water is poured over. Stir, then sit the plunger lid on top, and after 3-4 minutes of brewing, press down – very satisfying. Pour and enjoy.

 

Drip Brew Coffee

Drip Coffee

Big in Japan at the moment, drip brew involves putting a paper filter above your cup, adding your grounds, pouring the water, and letting it seep through. The grounds remain in the filter, so you’re good to go. It’s similar to a standard filter machine, but you’ve got loads more control to get the coffee you want. The V60 might be our favourite model. Quick and easy, and resulting in a clear and smooth cup of the good stuff.

 

Moka Pot

Moka coffee

An Italian classic, the Moka pot is what to turn to if you want an espresso fix. While not technically espresso, the pressure the Moka puts through the grounds are as close as you can get from a simple piece of kit, and result in a similar shot-sized measure. Water is added to the bottom chamber, the funnel is sat above that and the grounds are added before screwing the lid on. Place on the hob at a low heat, and wait 5 minutes or so for the water to boil through. You’ll hear a dry whistling sound. Boom. You’re in business. Delicious and strong, it’s the perfect morning pick-me-up.